Construction, Presentation and Consumption of Individualism in Social Media

Gulsum Calisir

Abstract


The concept ?f individualism involves the whole properties of being esteemed and confirmed of the individual in society. The situation of being esteemed is an extension of individuality. Together with social media, individuals can build new individualities right along with the present. Social media offers individuals a new individuality area. As a socialization medium, social media also lays the grounwork for a consumption of individualism during daily use. Different than consumption in real life, it is allowed for individuals consumption of individualism by texts, visuality, varied connections and comments in social media. At the same time, individual also exhausts his or her own individualism during construction process of his or her own individualism.

Consumption of individualism in daily life, seems to find its imaginary equivalent in social media. Individual realizes a consumption by sharing in social media what he or she eats, places he or she visits or shops in real life. In this way,individual both is able to reach more wide areas and to continue to be on the agenda. Social media offers individuals this chance. Individual can be on the agenda as he or she consumes and shares to the extent. As soon as the individual achieves this, he or she can gain admiration and comment; but at the moment he or she becomes silent, individual encounters the risk of falling down the agenda. So, individual trends to expend more in real life tos tay active in virtual world. The agenda in the real world is not enough anymore. Individual is wishing to deploy on a much more broad area in virtual world. In this respect, the work takes individuals dilemma of construction and consumption of individualism which he or she builds on social media, as its case.


Keywords


Social Media, Individuality, Consumption, Content construction

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.17349/jmc114306

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